09 June 2017

Girlfriends Across Space and Time

Don't you wish you could have known your Mom, your aunts, your grandmothers when you were the same age?  I do.  I'm taking a little trip this coming week to visit my grand girls:  the ones I wish I could have gone to nursing school with, back in the 1940s and 1950s, talked about boys, maybe even been a fly on the wall when Marylou and Ed tore up the dance floor, or spied on Donna and Paul, as they enjoyed a lager at the long bar at the fanciest restaurant in town.

I would have had artichokes with my Mom and Aunt, and nerded it up with my Dad and the hippie Christian set in the Bay Area, in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

In my family, women keep address books, and they keep recipe cards, so tonight, I'm redoing my address book, finally conceding the wisdom of pencil.  Millenials move... a lot.  It's not like too many of us are naming our manors and planting multi-generational orchards.  Perhaps someday.

I'm using the Rifle Paper company's new book.  It benefits from having room for many entries, including an email line.  And includes a section in back for important birthdays, anniversaries, etc.  It has a cute embossed design on the front, and is lined with paper a la the Rifle paper company.
I'm bringing some recipe cards with me to the land of my roots, so I can copy down the good stuff--that my parents and their siblings grew up with, that my grandparents grew up with:  my Great Grandmother's Christmas cookies, my Hungarian Great Grandmother's "Chicken Paprikash and Kenefles."

I am finally ready to take my place among the keepers-of-addresses and recipes.  To help on the recipe quest, I purchased Shannon Kirsten Illustration's Black and White Floral Recipe cards from her Etsy shop.  I can't wait to start recording some of the recipes that I grew up with, and that have been warming my family's kitchen at least since my great grandmothers!  What kind of hearth would I keep if I did not, from time to time, make and share the food my ancestors?  It is a practice which seems nearly universal among humanity.  Remembering people, dates, and flavors, is a great way to connect across our broader, global home, through time and space!



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